Murder At The Flamingo Book Review |The 1930s, Night Clubs, and Mystery|

8:02 AM


Hamish DeLuca runs away from home after battling with anxiety and feeling as though he's failed as a lawyer and son. He runs to Boston and straight to his ever confident cousin Luca who is opening a new nightclub, promising that Hamish can be himself here.
It's here in Boston that he meets Reggie, a girl who dreams of becoming more like Katherine Hepburn then Regina Van Buren. Together she and Hamish work together to get the Nightclub off the ground...but then a corpse is discovered at the Flamingo, and Hamish has decide between loyalty to his cousin and the truth.

Aw, a new Rachel McMillan book is always a pleasure, source of excitement, and wonderful summer read. Murder at the Flamingo is just the book to check off my summer reading list. Thrown into the 1930s, I get to experience something I rarely see in Christian Fiction: A look at the 1930s.
Not only is this one of my favorite time periods, but we experience the rich culture - as well as the nightclubs - of that time.
Aside from all of that, I was excited to see mental disorder addressed - another rare but growing thing in the story world. AND the characters endeared me to them pretty quickly - all in all I enjoyed the characters and world we get to experience.
That being said, don't expect a rip-roaring mystery too quickly (it doesn't happen until at least half way through the book), but that's not too much of a downer if you're just looking for a nice fiction book that takes you back in time to night clubs, smoking, dancing, and black and white movies.
I definitely shipped Hamish and Reggie, and I think the cover is beautiful.

All in all - highly recommend for a nice, summer read. This book reunites familiar characters from previous books while in a different place and time.
Enjoyed!

Thank you, thank you, book-look for the chance to read this book and review it (for free!)

You Might Also Like

4 of your thoughts

  1. sounds like a interesting book. : ) 1930s were the Great Depression right?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes sir! Though this 1930s book didn't focus on that as it did the city. =)

      Delete
  2. I'm going to have to check this book out, thanks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Totally! I'd love to hear your thoughts on it - enjoy. <3 <3 <3

      Delete


Comments make me smile, lift my spirits and give me the motivation to continue writing. In return I'll comment on your blog, because you're awesome and deserve it.